Eggshells

EggshellsAuthor: Caitriona Lally

Publisher: Melville House

Release Date: March 14, 2017

Rating: 3 Stars

Reviewer: Jessica Higgins

An interesting debut novel that explores loneliness even when you don’t know you’re lonely.

Vivian just doesn’t fit in. Never really has.  She now lives in a house that was willed to her by her late Great Aunt in Northern Dublin.  She was raised to believe that she was a changeling and could travel to other worlds, which she now attempts to access by walking around new neighborhoods and mapping them out, just in case.  She isn’t very close with her sister, also named Vivian, but tries all the same.  She is a society misfit.  One day she places an ad for a friend named Penelope just to find out why it doesn’t rhyme with antelope.  She takes adventures all the time even when those around her don’t understand what is going on.

This was a very different kind of book. I’m not really sure if Vivian has a bit of mental illness or just absolutely no understanding of society, even though she is in her twenties.  I can honestly say that I’ve never personally met anyone like her, but it would be interesting if I did.  I had the same reaction as the people around Vivian when she often opened her mouth because it was surprising what would come out.  Even so, it was still interesting to see where the story led.  It was literally just a snapshot in time of her life and didn’t really end.  It just didn’t continue even though we know that Vivian is out there somewhere on holiday with Penelope.

It was humorous at times and confusing at times. There was some pretty harsh language with some of the characters, but it was pretty believable based on their characters.  I recommend this book to mature audiences.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher. The views and opinions expressed within are my own.

All the Breaking Waves

all-the-breaking-wavesAuthor: Kerry Lonsdale

Publisher: Lake Union

Release Date: December 6, 2016

Rating: 4.5 Stars

Reviewer: Jessica Higgins

Sophomore novel from Kerry Lonsdale is another must read!

 

Molly Brennan has a secret. She is able to emphasize with other people and even has the gift of compulsion to make others do task she commands them in their mind.  In fact, all of the women ancestors have been able to do something as well.  Unfortunately, this gift has led to a tragic accident that caused her family to be torn apart, causing Molly to leave the town of Pacific Grove, California for good.  Now ten years later, Molly has discovered that her eight year old daughter also has abilities, but they are even more dangerous.  Cassie has premonitions of events five days before they happen and each day the premonitions get more vivid and Cassie experiences the events, including the pain and potentially even death.  Molly must now return to her grandmother at Pacific Grove to help train Cassie to not let her abilities destroy her, but she will be thrust back into the crowd from ten years ago including the soulmate she left behind.

 

Everything We Keep was a tremendous breakout novel that was extremely thought provoking.  This of course meant that I must read Lonsdale’s second novel with nervous anticipation that it wouldn’t be as good as the first.  Not to worry, it was just as good, if not better. All the Breaking Waves continued Lonsdale’s trend of a young female lead character in her upper twenties who is really coming into her own.  Molly is a very strong character who has been raising her daughter as a single mother.  She is a very different character than Aimee Tierney in Everything we Keep in that she is already used to doing things herself, but she isn’t really realizing her true potential in life.  Of course there is also some romance thrown in at just the right times.  Lonsdale is truly a master of her craft.  She has a unique way of blending a little bit of sci-fi into a contemporary setting that the reader finds completely believable.  It may also help that the Monterey peninsula is one of my favorite areas, so getting to visit there alongside Molly was a beautiful thing.  Needless to say, I am awaiting the next awesome read from Kerry Lonsdale!

There is some mild language throughout the book as well as two scenes that include some mild sexual dialogue. I recommend this book to mature young adults and up!

 

 

I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher. The views and opinions expressed throughout are mine.

Everything We Keep

Everything we keepAuthor: Kerry Lonsdale

Publisher: Lake Union

Release Date: August 1, 2016

Rating: 4.5 Stars

Reviewer: Jessica Higgins

Suspenseful, thought provoking, and just a good overall book!

Aimee Tierney has just had her life turned upside down. She just buried her fiancée.  On her wedding day.  If that weren’t bad enough, after the funeral a woman came by claiming to know that her fiancée, James, was still alive.  Aimee doesn’t believe her, but after realizing that she never saw the body, doubts begin to build in her mind.  A week after this, her parents announce that they have sold the family restaurant that Aimee grew up in and is currently sous chef.  With her world crumbling around her, she has to figure out what she wants to do and how to move on.  Eventually, she decides to open her own restaurant, which she uses the money given to her by her late fiancée’s brother.  In the process, she meets Ian, a photographer who is exhibiting his photos in a local gallery.  There is instant electricity between the two of them, but Aimee just can’t bring herself to act on it.  As the doubts begin to build and she continues to receive clues that James might be alive in Mexico, Aimee decides to go find out for herself.  Maybe she can finally either get James back or move on.

This summer I have been blessed with books that have made me think. This one was no exception.  Every time that I thought I have it figured out, the author kept pushing me in another direction.  I’m so glad that she did because it gave me a great ride.

Even though Aimee is twenty-seven, I would still consider this a coming of age novel. She has always been dependent on somebody her entire life and she is finally coming into her own.  She has to make her own decisions and then she finally makes the decision that affects her life from that point forward.  Along the way there is plenty of humor and tense romance to keep it interesting.

There was some occasional strong foul language and a couple of love scenes that weren’t explicit, but pretty easy to get the point of what was going on. I wouldn’t recommend this book to YA.  More to the twenty something crowd!

I received a complimentary copy of this book through the TLC Book Tours. The views and opinions expressed throughout are mine.