Catch 42

Author: Felix Holzapfel

Publisher: Quovabiz Inc.

Release Date: May 13, 2021

Rating: 4 out of 5.

What happens when dystopia, quantum computing, and VR collide?  You get Catch 42!

Dan is a typical guy who is down on his luck. His family restaurant began to suffer financial difficulties, but he couldn’t accept failure.  So now he works jobs nonstop to provide for his family.  Unfortunately, after so much stress, he wife, Vicky, took their two kids and left California to return to her home state of Kentucky to live on her parents’ farm.  Dan is too full of pride to throw in the towel, so he continues to work to try to make a living so that they will come back.  One night, a mysterious voice from the future calls out for his help with a problem.  In several years, the world will experience catastrophe after catastrophe including pandemics, global warming, food supply chain disruption, and a cyber war that will decimate the population down to 20% of what it is today.  As a result, leaders put aside their differences and have created a virtual world known as WeYou to bring humanity together.  But things aren’t what they seem, and underground movement known as Teccupy is working to overthrow the virtual lies that they believe WeYou has constructed.  Both organizations want Dan to help solve a puzzle that neither can master.

This new genre of dystopian tech thrillers that dabble in speculative fiction has really become quite popular and I can’t get enough of them.  Catch 42 was no exception as it kicked off with a bang and never let up.  Most of this book centers around Dan’s immersion into the world WeYou and learning about how the world has changed while searching for the key to bring immortality to the physical world.  Some of the jargon goes pretty technical, but it’s not too difficult to keep up with.  The occasional chapters thrown in with Vicky and the kids didn’t bring much but kept them in the loop for the ending.  There is also a lot unsaid at the end, but that is where the speculative part comes into play.  Overall, I enjoyed this and there isn’t much language or mature themes throughout, just a good read!

I received a complimentary copy of this title from the publisher.  The views and opinions expressed within are my own.

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